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cleverdevil

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If I were a Jeopardy category, I would be “Potent Potables.”

 
 

I know Game of Thrones ended pretty poorly, but I am honestly pretty excited for HBO’s Westworld now that I’ve seen the season three preview – https://mobile.twitter.com/WestworldHBO/status/1130278213668753409

 

All that said, I am thinking its time to move a subset of my email off of Google anyway. Perhaps I will start with just my personal account and my wife’s personal account, which will greatly reduce the cost, and address the vast majority of my privacy concerns.

 

To those asking why I haven’t already moved my email off of Google, the answer is simple: moving it all would cost me several hundred dollars per month on Fastmail or ProtonMail. Google’s GSuite email hosting has always been walled off from their ad machine as well.

 

The New Yorker features the IndieWeb and Micro.blog

Excited to see that the IndieWeb has been featured in The New Yorker:

...a loose collective of developers and techno-utopians that calls itself the IndieWeb has been creating another alternative. The movement’s affiliates are developing their own social-media platforms, which they say will preserve what’s good about social media while jettisoning what’s bad. They hope to rebuild social media according to principles that are less corporate and more humane.

I’m not a big fan of the term “techno-utopian,” but hey, visibility is good.

The article also includes an entire section on Micro.blog:

In 2017, Manton Reece, an IndieWeb developer based in Austin, Texas, launched a Kickstarter for a service called Micro.blog. On its surface, Micro.blog looks a lot like Twitter or Instagram; you can follow users and see their posts sorted into a time line, and, if you like a post, you can send a reply that everyone can see. When I checked Micro.blog’s public time line recently, the top post was a picture of a blooming dogwood tree, with the caption “Spring is coming!”

Even as it offers a familiar interface, though, everyone posting to Micro.blog does so on his or her own domain hosted on Micro.blog’s server or on their own personal server. Reece’s software acts as an aggregator, facilitating a sense of community and gathering users’ content so that it can be seen on a single screen. Users own what they write and can do whatever they want with it—including post it, simultaneously, to other competing aggregators. IndieWeb developers argue that this system—which they call posse, for “publish on your own site, syndicate elsewhere”—encourages competition and innovation while allowing users to vote with their feet.

A huge congratulations to Manton, Aaron, and Tantek for the publicity for both Micro.blog and the larger IndieWeb movement. Let’s keep working to make the internet a better, safer, more inclusive place.

 
 

My personal email is on my own domain, but is backed by Google’s GSuite. They claim that they don’t index and use the content for ads like they do with GMail, but I am skeptical. Maybe this year is when I finally migrate my email elsewhere...

 

Earlier this week, I attended a fundraiser at a brewery and glanced at the signup form for the brewery’s email list. The list had a few dozen people, but every single address ended in “gmail.com,” “yahoo.com,” or “iCloud.com.” https://www.cnbc.com/2019/05/17/google-gmail-tracks-purchase-history-how-to-delete-it.html

 
 

Finally booked my travel for the 2019 IndieWeb Summit next month in Portland, OR. One of my favorite events of the year in one of my favorite cities to visit. – https://2019.indieweb.org/summit

 
 

Take Back Your Web by Tantek Çelik – Fantastic Talk!

Fantastic talk by Tantek Çelik about owning your identity on the web, and fighting back against the centralization of identity into harmful social networks like Facebook. Includes an inspiring introduction that sets context, and then an overview of the and related technologies like microformats2, webmention, micropub, microsub, and more. Must watch!

 
 

My goodness I can’t stand the TSA. I’m pre-check and pay for CLEAR as well as Global Entry. I still get randomly selected for screening and have to opt out of invasive body scans. I’d pay extra to never have to deal with them again.

 
 
 

The most important lesson I have ever learned as a manager of people: family comes first. Give your team room to be there for their family. They’ll be there for you, too.