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WordCamp Atlanta: Day One

4 min read

I'm happy to have traveled to Atlanta today to attend WordCamp ATL, a two-day gathering of WordPress professionals designed to educate, connect, and share experiences. My employer was a sponsor of the event, and it was a great opportunity for me to visit my old stomping grounds, talk to customers, and learn about what's going on in the WordPress community.

I thought it'd be fun to touch on a few of the highlights and themes from day one of the event.

Path to Success

Easily the most common theme of day one was enabling success. The majority of attendees of WordCamp ATL are trying to build sustainable businesses designing and building websites for their customers. Atlanta has produced quite a few successful WordPress businesses running the gamut from individual freelancer to large agencies and everything in between, and many of them are speakers.

In my conversations with attendees, a common refrain has been "how do I create success for my clients, and therefore for my business." The day kicked off with Troy Dean's keynote about building his seven-figure business on top of WordPress, and he tackled this question head-on, encouraging the audience to build their business on "authenticity, congruence, and intention," not just a quest for money. He summarized his talk with a quote:

You can have everything in life you want, if you will just help other people get what they want.

Zig Ziglar

Other talks focused on effective marketing, messaging, and packaging to build successful WordPress businesses. But, success isn't just about creating success for your clients, its also about creating success for yourself, which leads me into the next key theme for the day:

Process, Automation, and Time to Publish

Entrepreneurs face many challenges on the road to success, and the biggest one may be the sheer volume of work to do. Time is the most precious resource of an entrepreneur, and many of my conversations with attendees on day one focused on making the best use of limited time.

For designers just getting started, I heard about page building plugins like WP Beaver Builder and leveraging premium themes to get from proposal to client delivery as quickly as possible. Genesis and Underscores came up more than once, as did many theme vendors. In the early days of a designer's business, they'll be attracting customers with very limited budgets, and being able to whip out a website rapidly is critical.

Once a designer moves to the next phase of their business, their attention turns to automation and process. There were several talks about standardizing your workflow to reduce wasted time, and there was also a great talk about leveraging automation to optimize your business by David Laietta of Orange Blossom Media. David covered using platforms like IFTTT in concert with services like MailChimp, Slack, and Trello to fully automate everything from proposals, to contracts, to client requests to make sure nothing falls through the cracks. David will be launching a site called Bear Hacks in the coming days which focuses on automation, and I'm looking forward to seeing it.

Design is Still King

Finally, I'm very pleased to see that good design is still a fundamental topic of conversation and focus in the WordPress community. There were excellent talks on typography, responsive design, and design best practices. A room full of smart, technically-minded creatives is one of the most enjoyable places for me to spend a weekend, so it was great to see that design is still a focus.

I'm looking forward to what tomorrow holds, and I'll try and post a followup if I can grab some time.